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Patient Education

Our Health Library information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist our patients to learn more about their health. Our providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

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Your searched on: rashes

Diaper Rash
Diaper rash (diaper dermatitis) is a skin problem caused by the skin staying wet, rubbing from the diaper, and contact with chemicals in the urine and stool. The skin may look red, raw, scalded, or burned. While a diaper rash is uncomfortable, generally it is not a serious problem. Diaper rash is the most common skin...

Heat Rash
Discusses heat rash (prickly heat). Looks at causes and symptoms of heat rash in babies. Covers signs of infection. Offers home treatment and prevention tips.

Rashes or Sores in the Groin
Rashes in the groin or genital area are usually caused by irritation of the skin from many sources, such as clothes rubbing against the skin. Rashes that occur without other symptoms are usually minor and often go away with home treatment. Contact dermatitis A common cause of a rash is contact with a substance that...

Vaginal Rashes and Sores
A rash in your vaginal area ( vulva) may be caused by irritation of the skin from many sources, such as clothes rubbing against the skin. Rashes that occur without other symptoms are usually minor and often go away with home treatment. Contact dermatitis A common cause of a rash is contact with a substance that...

Caregiving: Preventing Rashes in the Groin Area
The groin area needs careful cleaning to prevent rashes and infections. Rashes are most likely to form in moist areas where skin touches skin, such as the folds of the groin, under the breasts, and on the stomach. For a larger-sized person, other areas of concern are the folds on the neck, arms, inner elbows, legs...

Medicines That May Cause Rashes in Children
Many prescription and nonprescription medicines can cause a rash. A few common examples are: Antibiotics. Aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen (Aleve). Pain medicines, such as codeine. Seizure medicines. If a rash occurs after your child has begun a new medicine: Stop giving the medicine to your...

Rash, Age 11 and Younger
Discusses common skin rashes that affect those 11 and younger. Covers chickenpox, diaper rash, prickly heat, and contact dermatitis. Offers home treatment tips for fever and itching. Includes interactive tool to help you decide when to call a doctor.

Rash, Age 12 and Older
Lists common causes of skin rashes in those 12 and older. Covers allergies, chronic skin problems like eczema, or contact with poisonous plants like poison oak. Covers home treatment. Includes interactive tool to help you decide when to call a doctor.

Skin Rashes: Home Treatment
Home treatment often can relieve discomfort and itching until a rash clears up. If you have come in contact with a substance that causes contact dermatitis (such as poison ivy, oak, or sumac), immediately wash the area with large amounts of water. Over-the-counter medicines may help relieve itching...

Newborn Rashes and Skin Conditions
What are the most common skin conditions in newborns? It's very common for newborns to have rashes or other skin problems. Some of them have long names that are hard to say and sound scary. But most will go away on their own in a few days or weeks. Here are some of the things you may notice about your baby's skin...

Medicines That May Cause a Rash
Many prescription and nonprescription medicines can cause a rash. A few common examples are: Antibiotics. Aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen (Aleve). Pain medicines, such as codeine. Seizure medicines. If a rash occurs after you have begun a new medicine: Call the doctor who prescribed the medicine...

Poison Ivy, Oak, or Sumac: Rash From Indirect Contact
The oil (urushiol) that causes the rash from poison ivy, oak, or sumac can be spread to skin from: Sporting equipment, such as fishing rods, balls, baseball bats and gloves, and hockey sticks. Lawn and garden tools, such as lawn mower handles,...

Scarlet Fever
Briefly discusses scarlet fever, a term used for strep throat with a rash. Covers symptoms like red rash on chest, on abdomen, and in skin folds. Covers how it is treated. Also covers complications.

Poison Ivy, Oak, or Sumac
Discusses rash (also called contact dermatitis) caused by touching poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. Covers risks. Offers home treatment and prevention tips. Covers medicines to relieve symptoms.

Seabather's Eruption
What is seabather's eruption? Seabather's eruption is a rash that occurs when a swimmer is stung by marine life larvae. The condition has many names, including sea lice, pika-pika, sea poisoning, sea critters, and ocean itch. What causes seabather's eruption? Two types of marine life that generally...

Roseola
What is roseola? Roseola (roseola infantum) is a mild illness caused by a virus. It is generally harmless and is most common in children 6 months to 2 years of age. It is rare after age 4. What causes roseola? Roseola is caused by two common viruses. The viruses belong to the family of herpes viruses...

miconazole and zinc oxide topical
Miconazole and zinc oxide topical (for the skin) is a combination antifungal medicine that fights infections caused by fungus. The ointment form is used to treat diaper rash with yeast infection (candidiasis) in children and babies who are at least 4 weeks old. Miconazole and zinc oxide topical ointment is for use only...

Chickenpox: Controlling the Itch
Guides you through how to control itching when you or your child has chickenpox (varicella) rash. Includes home treatment with baths, over-the-counter medicines, and lotions. Covers avoiding scratching to prevent infection and scarring.

Yeast Skin Infection
A yeast infection is usually caused by a fungus called Candida albicans. This kind of yeast naturally lives on your skin. When too much yeast grows, it is called a yeast skin infection. Yeast skin infections tend to happen in skin-to-skin areas....

First Aid
Provides links on nosebleeds, rashes, and blisters. Also includes topics addressing more serious first aid emergencies, such as choking rescues and sprained ankles.

Chickenpox (Varicella)
Discusses vaccine-preventable illness that causes itchy rash and red spots or blisters (pox) all over the body. Covers home treatment, including resting and taking medicines to reduce fever, itching. Includes info on shingles.

Groin Problems and Injuries
Discusses groin problems and injuries. Looks at acute injuries, hernias, rashes, and other groin problems in children. Covers signs and symptoms. Offers home treatment and prevention tips. Covers emergencies such as severe pain and signs of shock.

zinc oxide topical
Zinc oxide is a mineral. Zinc oxide topical (for the skin) is used to treat diaper rash, minor burns, severely chapped skin, or other minor skin irritations. Zinc oxide rectal suppositories are used to treat itching, burning, irritation, and other rectal discomfort caused by hemorrhoids or painful bowel movements. There...

Shingles
Discusses shingles, a condition caused by the virus that causes chickenpox (herpes zoster). Discusses who is most likely to get it. Describes how shingles rash causes pain and the treatment for it. Includes info on the shingles vaccine.

Scalp Problems
Many people have hair or scalp problems. Hair may thin or fall out, break off, or grow slowly. Dandruff or an itching or peeling scalp may cause embarrassment and discomfort. Hair and scalp problems can be upsetting, but they usually are not caused...

Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)
Covers long-lasting skin problem which is also known as eczema or atopic eczema. Looks at symptoms like dry skin, itching, and a red, raised rash. Covers treatments including using moisturizing creams and medicines. Offers prevention tips.

Atopic Dermatitis: Taking Care of Your Skin
Covers good skin care as an essential part of controlling the itch and rash of atopic dermatitis. Looks at what atopic dermatitis is. Explains why skin care is important. Gives tips on keeping your skin hydrated and avoiding irritants.

Marine Stings and Scrapes
Walking on a beach or swimming in the ocean can be fun and relaxing. But just like any other activities, accidents can happen. This topic will help you determine the next steps to take if you have a jellyfish or Portuguese man-of-war sting, seabather's eruption, or a coral scrape. Stings Jellyfish and Portuguese...

Heat-Related Illnesses
Discusses heat-related illnesses. Looks at heatstroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat rash, and dehydration. Covers signs and symptoms. Offers home treatment and prevention tips. Covers emergency first aid treatment.

topical emollients
Emollients are substances that moisten and soften your skin. Topical (for the skin) emollients are used to treat or prevent dry skin. Topical emollients are sometimes contained in products that also treat acne, chapped lips, diaper rash, cold sores, or other minor skin irritation. There are many brands and forms of...

lanolin topical
Lanolin is a natural substance found in sheep's wool. This product is made with manufacturing processes that reduce certain allergens in the lanolin. Lanolin topical (for the skin) is used to treat or prevent dry skin, itching or other skin irritation caused by conditions such as diaper rash, radiation therapy skin...

calamine (topical)
Calamine is an anti-itch medicine that works by causing a cooling sensation as it evaporates on your skin. Calamine also dries oozing or weeping from minor skin irritation. Calamine topical (for the skin) is used to treat itching and skin irritation caused by chickenpox, insect bites or stings, measles, eczema, sunburn...

Bruises and Blood Spots Under the Skin
Discusses how and why bruises and blood spots might develop. Offers checklist to help you decide when to call a doctor. Offers home treatment and prevention tips.

Poison Ivy, Oak, or Sumac: Tips for Washing
If you have contact with poison ivy, oak, or sumac, immediately wash areas of the skin that may have touched the plant. Sometimes the resulting rash (contact dermatitis) can be completely avoided by washing the affected areas with plenty of water...

Poison Ivy, Oak, or Sumac: Relieving the Itch
A rash caused by poison ivy, oak, or sumac may itch and produce blisters. If you get a mild rash, you can take care of it at home. Here are some tips to help with itching: Apply a cool, wet cloth for 15 to 30 minutes several times a day. Take short,...

Skin Changes Caused by a Medicine
Skin changes are a common side effect of many prescription and nonprescription medicines. Common side effects include: Rash. Any medicine can cause a rash. Two examples are aspirin and antibiotics. Color changes in the skin. A few examples of medicines that can cause this are: Birth control...

mineral oil (oral/rectal)
Mineral oil is used to treat occasional constipation. The oral form is taken by mouth. The rectal form is used as an enema applied in the rectum. Mineral oil may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Jellyfish Stings: Allergic Reaction
The reaction that you have to a jellyfish or Portuguese man-of-war sting depends on many things. The potency of the venom changes with the type of jellyfish and also is stronger during some seasons than in others. Other things that affect the...

Jellyfish Sting: Home Treatment
The rash and skin irritation that occurs with minor jellyfish or Portuguese man-of-war stings will usually go away with home treatment. Seabather's eruption is a rash that develops from the stings of jellyfish or sea anemone larvae. Although these rashes are annoying, they are not a serious medical problem. When an...

Pregnancy: Stretch Marks, Itching, and Skin Changes
Stretch marks (striae gravidarum) are lines on the skin that may appear late in pregnancy. They look like slightly indented pink, red, dark, or white streaks, depending on your skin color. Stretch marks are most common on the belly, but they can...

bacitracin topical
Bacitracin is an antibiotic that fights bacteria. Bacitracin topical (for the skin) is used to prevent infection in minor cuts, scrapes, and burns. Bacitracin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

bacitracin ophthalmic
Bacitracin is an antibiotic that kills bacteria. Bacitracin ophthalmic (for the eyes) is used to treat bacterial infections of the eyes. Bacitracin ophthalmic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

bacitracin (injection)
Bacitracin injection is an antibiotic that treats staph infection caused by a bacteria called staphylococcus (STAF-il-oh-KOK-us). Bacitracin injection is used in infants to treat pneumonia. It is also used to treat an infection that causes pus to build up between the lungs and the membrane that covers them. Bacitracin...

Female Genital Problems and Injuries
Most women experience minor vaginal problems from time to time. These problems can be related to menstrual cycles, sex, infection, birth control methods, aging, medicines, or changes after pregnancy. A change in your normal vaginal discharge may be the first sign of a vaginal problem. Changes in urination, such as...

Home Remedies for Bites and Stings
Home remedies may help to relieve the pain of an insect bite. While they haven't been proven scientifically, many people report relief. You can try one or more and see whether they help you. Apply calamine lotion, underarm deodorant, or witch hazel...

miconazole oral (buccal)
Miconazole is an antifungal medicine that fights infections caused by fungus. Miconazole buccal is a pill placed between your check and gum to treat candida (yeast) infections inside the mouth. Miconazole buccal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

miconazole vaginal
Miconazole is an antifungal medication. It prevents fungus from growing. Miconazole vaginal is used to treat vaginal candida (yeast) infections. Miconazole vaginal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

miconazole topical
Miconazole topical is an antifungal medication. Miconazole topical prevents fungus from growing on your skin. Miconazole topical (for the skin) is used to treat skin infections such as athlete's foot, jock itch, ringworm, tinea versicolor (a fungus that discolors the skin), and yeast infections of the skin...

salicylic acid topical
Salicylic acid is a keratolytic (peeling agent). Salicylic acid causes shedding of the outer layer of skin. Salicylic acid topical (for the skin) is used in the treatment of acne, dandruff, seborrhea, or psoriasis, and to remove corns, calluses, and warts. There are many brands and forms of salicylic acid available. Not...